Consultation

Through our faculty and partners, we have the experience and expertise to provide technical assistance, training, and consultation in order to improve the management, productivity, and accountability of government, private, and non-profit organizations engaged in the delivery of health and human services.

Consulting Services

  • Strategic Business and Action Planning
  • Organizational Assessment and Development
  • Development of Performance Measures and Indicators
  • Productivity Improvement
  • Survey Research
  • Data Analysis
  • Program Evaluation

 


In partnership with Aspire Training and Consulting, the following onsite and online trainings are offered:

Live Onsite Trainings

Medical Case Management/Direct Care Certificate Program

The Case Management Certificate curriculum was developed in response to the needs of direct care staff (i.e. case managers, patient navigators, etc.) and to meet the HRSA Medical Case Management definition requirements. It is based on best practices and research on case management, as well as input from direct care workers and supervisors in human services, community based organizations, AIDS Service Organizations, Ryan White Grantees, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work and others.

The Certificate Program is provided in two versions: one for those who work in the HIV/AIDS field and another for those in general direct care. Each program consists of required online trainings (along with one optional course, Motivational Interviewing for Supervisors) and two full-day, in-person workshops; approximately 24 hours of training.

Motivational Interviewing

One Day Workshops to 15 hour Workshop Series

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a nationally recognized evidence-based best practice for enhancing client outcomes through direct, compassionate conversations. This client-centered approaches assists clients in understanding ambivalence to change and in maximizing opportunities toward change. MI also assists direct care workers in expressing empathy, rolling with emotionally- and energy-charged situations, offering discrepancies, discussing options, and supporting self efficacy. Research indicates that the best approach to integrating new skills and knowledge includes training, along with practical application and coaching. It is highly recommended to maximize opportunities for true incorporation of MI on the job by offering training and coaching.

Best Practices in Direct Care

A brief overview of a nation-wide study of case management. At the end of the section learners will be able to identify best practices in case management.

Trauma Informed Case Management

This section provides the learner with knowledge to conceptualize the individual needs of clients, to position them for success. At the end of the section learners will be able to: (1) Identify the impact of stress/trauma; (2); Understand how trauma impacts the brain/behavior; and (3) Conceptualize the case manager’s role in working with a stressed/traumatized client.

Self Management

This section provides information to enhance the direct care worker’s understanding and ability to address health literacy and adherence. Discussion and approaches will connect all to best practices with MI skills. At the end of the section learners will be able to: (1) Have strategies to increase care adherence; (2) Better understand how to enhance health literacy; and (3) Utilize MI techniques to discuss adherence with clients.

Self-Care

One often overlooked skill necessary in the helping field is the ability to stay healthy and effective in an extremely stressful job where burnout and secondary trauma are real threats. This section provides strategies to enhance health and overall performance. At the end of the section learners will be able to: (1) Identify the impact of stress, trauma or burnout on the helper; and (2) Plan to implement self care strategies to enhance personal and/or professional well-being.

Online Trainings

Helper as a Person

Sometimes it is difficult being human in human services. This workshop gives the learner basics self-care skills in direct care. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Define appropriate professional boundaries; (2) Identify Transference and Counter Transference; (3) Identify the dynamics of burn-out; (4) Understand the serious health dangers of burn-out; (5) Define vicarious trauma, secondary trauma, and compassion fatigue; and (6) Understand how to maximize wellness in the helping field.

Therapeutic Communication

This workshop enhances the direct care worker’s ability to communicate with clients . At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Identify the basic elements of therapeutic communication; (2) Identify the obstacles to effective communication; (3) Increase knowledge about the fundamental skills for therapeutic communication; and (4) Learn new communication techniques to utilize immediately.

Multiculturalism

Working in the helping field means working with a very diverse group of clients. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Define key terms, such as culture, ethnicity, race and cultural competence; (2) Understand what it means to be a culturally competent helper; (3) Describe the impact of culture on personal development; and (4) Utilize new approaches to cultural competence in work with clients.

Approaches to Difficult Situations

Direct care workers deal with many challenging situations including client struggles with mental health and substance abuse. This workshop teaches the learner how to deal effectively with difficult situations . At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Identify the facts about escalation; (2) Manage the verbal escalation continuum; and (3) Identify therapeutic strategies in dealing with difficult situations.

HIV 101

The better direct care workers understand HIV, the better they can support and educate clients. Research shows that client understanding of HIV increases adherence and health outcomes. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Explain the life cycle of HIV; (2) Identify HIV transmission and risk factors; (3) Identify the dynamics and limitations of HIV testing; (4) Identify different labs; (5) Explain the basics of HIV treatment; and (6) Explain the basics of HIV medication and side effects.

HIPAA

As a helping professional, it is essential to understand confidentiality and HIPAA. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Identify the key components of HIPAA; (2) Define what HIPAA does; (3) Understand the guidelines for releasing protected health information; and (4) Understand the guidelines for technology.

Mandatory Reporting

Learn about Mandatory Reporting and other requirements as a direct care worker . At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Define Informed Consent; (2) Identify the elements of Duty to Warn; (3) Understand Mandatory Reporting; and (4) Understand reporting as it relates to At-Risk Adults.

Service Planning and Monitoring

Learn how to effectively and efficiently utilize service plans and monitor client progress. Critical to funding and service delivery, this training examines best practices in utilizing paperwork to improve client outcomes. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Identify the service planning cycle; (2) Name the reasons for service planning; (3) Write measurable objectives; and (4) Write a service plan for re-engagement in care.

Stages of Change

Learn about the stages of change and how to utilize them with clients . At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Identify key attributes of clients in each stage of change; and (2) Describe the Helper’s tasks in working with clients in each stage of change.

Harm Reduction

Learn how to apply harm reduction approaches to client-centered care . At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Apply Harm Reduction theory; (2) Identify key tenets of Harm Reduction; and (3) Recognize Harm Reduction approaches to client-centered care.

Motivational Interviewing

This workshop introduces Motivational Interviewing (MI) theory and offers specific MI approaches for maximizing client outcomes. At the end of the workshop learners will be able to: (1) Define Motivational Interviewing (MI); (2) Identify the 4 fundamental principles of MI; (3) Identify “The Fundamental” helping skills; (4) Understand tools to assess readiness for change; (5) Assess where to start with the many goals participants present; and (6) Understand methods to evoke change talk.

 

For more information or to schedule, please contact finhealth2014@fhinst.com or Melinda Marasch at Melinda@aspire2bu.org.